Wifi Guide with Parrot OS


#1

I don’t own the video or anything but its a pretty nifty video showing the Parrot tools being used and a decent explanation about how to use Airgeddon.

Enjoy :slight_smile:


(Mike Snowhill) #2

nice one - not I know what to use my Parrot distro for … :wink:


#3

As long as it’s legal and you are using it for a good legal purpose :stuck_out_tongue:.

However I would suggest you partner it with this kit.

It might help.


#4

So this is an excellent starter guide to help with Airgeddon. :slight_smile:

http://www.hackingarticles.in/hack-wireless-network-using-airgeddon/


(bow to the cow.. m00) #5

Can I be frustrated with the fact that airgeddon is just a tool to help you use other tools and now we have tutorials and instructions on how to use that tool? And that particular tool is pretty blunt and clear about how to use it, like even if the most popular languages are your 3rd language, it should make enough sense.


#6

So here is there thing with that statement. The reality is computing in general is increasing in it’s complexity and although standard principles are still about there is significant differences now that pretty much interfaces are needed. Also the fact is computer programmers and computer admins and users in general are really really lazy…

LoL. Like really lazy.

Regards

Troll


(bow to the cow.. m00) #7

I suppose I was just venting a little. I have to admit, when I am feeling lazy, I have fired up airgeddon instead of launching 2 terminals, opening a text file/grabbing a sticky note and writing down a AP mac, client mac, start monitoring and deauthing (plus the other automations, that dictionary is fairly weak though for WPA2… common example of course this guy’s target was using 87654321… OF COURSE!).

So, without wasting too much of my own time, here’s a way I can be useful and give some users a tip.
When you are capturing a WPA2 handshake in airgeddon -
It launches two windows for you, the one with all the white text is your friend (the other is just going to leave you cold and alone shortly, don’t mind that, it did you a quick favor). What you want to see (and airgeddon probably also told you this) is ‘handshake captured’ in the upper right hand of that window with the white text that popped up. IT MAY NOT SHOW UP RIGHT AWAY
If you look at the bottom of that window, this is where the clients the other window was deauthenticating would be. Hopefully, you’ll notice one or all of those clients is now showing a lot of LOST packets. That’s GOOD. Just because airgeddon said the attack is over and the other window closed already and it asked if you got the handshake and it hasn’t show up yet, BE PATIENT when those clients LOST number goes back down to 0 or near 0, they’ve reauthenticated and if for about any reason you still don’t see handshake captured, you can safely assume you’ve missed it and either try the same attack again or try any other one.

The first two (mdk3 and aireplay) are very similar attacks. mdk3 is more useful if you haven’t discovered any clients yet, it will probably knock everyone off and one may show up that had yet to be detected (this happens a lot, if say the only active clients are like some wifi printer or whatever, that basically isn’t doing anything)… aireplay, in my experience, works much better if you have already seen clients. And that other one, WIDS confusion, that’s pretty dick as fuck and a great one to try if you ALREADY see clients, but they’re ignoring your deauth/deassoc attempts. I haven’t seen it knock anything offline in a few years, but it used to knock some smaller Cisco IOS machines and things down, not too long ago. That’s a very mean and noisy attack, I’d only use if the clients are not responding to deauth/deassoc. But, you can do whatever.

As always, you want to be as close to your targets as possible, super important with the WPS brute methods (still relevant with pixiedust also). Since, I’m sure all of you are using these on your own machines or otherwise with permission, that shouldn’t be a problem.

However, if you find yourself chained up somewhere and have your laptop handy and a directional antenna (or a proper “cantenna”), you can do some of these things from a pretty good distance away (like 80 yards up the hill from the apartment complex’s leasing office, where you left your own router/modem combo in the lobby).